PARTNERSHIPS

Oshi Health, Inc. is an independent digital health company, founded in 2018, that is revolutionizing the management and treatment of IBD. Oshi empowers people with IBD through tracking and education, and it will support IBD stakeholders within the healthcare community, including medical researchers, with data that enables new treatment advances and care optimization. The company is led by digital health veteran and CEO Daniel Weinstein, who previously co-founded Cohero Health, which is disrupting the care of asthma and COPD through its connected mobile platform. The company has raised a significant Series A round of funding led by a leading global healthcare company.

Oshi Health, Inc. is an independent digital health company, founded in 2018, that is revolutionizing the management and treatment of IBD. Oshi empowers people with IBD through tracking and education, and it will support IBD stakeholders within the healthcare community, including medical researchers, with data that enables new treatment advances and care optimization. The company is led by digital health veteran and CEO Daniel Weinstein, who previously co-founded Cohero Health, which is disrupting the care of asthma and COPD through its connected mobile platform. The company has raised a significant Series A round of funding led by a leading global healthcare company.

DOCTORS & RESEARCHERS

Doctors

Improved care for your patients with IBDIBD, Crohns, Colitis doctor discussing care with patient in hospital

Oshi Health supports healthcare providers with a patient-empowered mobile app focused on health & wellness tracking plus monitoring.

The Oshi mobile app is proven and reliable. It uses two of the highest ranked validated PRO questionnaires for mobile use — UCLA mHealth Index for UC/CD and ICHOM IBD Control. The benefits of tracking with Oshi are many. It improves the quality of care you are able to deliver to your patients by empowering you with longitudinally tracked health data. It also reduces trial and error for patients by helping to identify key characteristics that might indicate a match for specific treatments or medications.

In addition to tracking, Oshi is an all-in-one app that provides dynamic and engaging content for patients that is medically-sound and reviewed by physicians and experts.

This app is great to have in your back pocket as you attend doctor’s appointments. You can look at all the information you’ve tracked and be able to communicate clearly what your needs are and where your concerns are. We now have the power to advance our own healthcare and give our GIs a clear look at the story of our day-to-day lives. –Natalie Hayden, Patient Advocate

Please contact us to learn about ways we can support your practice and patients.

DOCTORS & RESEARCHERS

Doctors

IBD, Crohns, Colitis doctor discussing care with patient in hospitalImproved care for your patients with IBD

Oshi Health supports healthcare providers with a patient-empowered mobile app focused on health & wellness tracking plus monitoring.

The Oshi mobile app is proven and reliable. It uses two of the highest ranked validated PRO questionnaires for mobile use — UCLA mHealth Index for UC/CD and ICHOM IBD Control. The benefits of tracking with Oshi are many. It improves the quality of care you are able to deliver to your patients by empowering you with longitudinally tracked health data. It also reduces trial and error for patients by helping to identify key characteristics that might indicate a match for specific treatments or medications.

In addition to tracking, Oshi is an all-in-one app that provides dynamic and engaging content for patients that is medically-sound and reviewed by physicians and experts.

This app is great to have in your back pocket as you attend doctor’s appointments. You can look at all the information you’ve tracked and be able to communicate clearly what your needs are and where your concerns are. We now have the power to advance our own healthcare and give our GIs a clear look at the story of our day-to-day lives.

–Natalie Hayden, Patient Advocate

Please contact us to learn about ways we can support your practice and patients.

Researchers

Customize Oshi for your clinical studies

Oshi Health empowers medical researchers with a digital solution for patient engagement, data gathering, and analysis.

The Oshi Health platform can be customized and optimized to you needs to create an integrated end-to-end patient interface for GI-focused clinical studies. Our platform is the world-leading tool in IBD for collecting robust clinical phenotyping and patient-reported data. We can power your research study and data collection.

Our digital platform:

  • Adapts to specific research, study design, and data collection needs
  • Improves patient experience and engagement with flexible features and content
  • Maximizes study data set with opportunity to integrate with devices, wearables, and sensors
  • Integrates captured data directly with existing research database
  • Allows for on-demand study design improvement through real-time analysis and feedback
  • Manages patient consent / reconsent

Charlie Lees, Clinical Advisor

Oshi Health is innovating with disruptive tech that will improve the lives of people with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The research platform is the world-leading tool in IBD for collecting robust clinical phenotyping and patient reported data. –Dr. Charlie Lees, Gastroenterologist & Researcher, University of Edinburgh

Please contact us to learn about ways we can support your clinical study.

Researchers

Customize Oshi for your clinical studies

Oshi Health empowers medical researchers with a digital solution for patient engagement, data gathering, and analysis.

The Oshi Health platform can be customized and optimized to you needs to create an integrated end-to-end patient interface for GI-focused clinical studies. Our platform is the world-leading tool in IBD for collecting robust clinical phenotyping and patient-reported data. We can power your research study and data collection.

Our digital platform:

  • Adapts to specific research, study design, and data collection needs
  • Improves patient experience and engagement with flexible features and content
  • Maximizes study data set with opportunity to integrate with devices, wearables, and sensors
  • Integrates captured data directly with existing research database
  • Allows for on-demand study design improvement through real-time analysis and feedback
  • Manages patient consent / reconsent

Charlie Lees, Clinical Advisor

Oshi Health is innovating with disruptive tech that will improve the lives of people with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The research platform is the world-leading tool in IBD for collecting robust clinical phenotyping and patient reported data.

–Dr. Charlie Lees, Gastroenterologist & Researcher, University of Edinburgh

Please contact us to learn about ways we can support your clinical study.

EMPLOYERS & PAYERS

Oshi Health shares the same goals of employers & payers in optimizing health & wellness and preventing diseases.

Currently, $28 billion is spent on IBD care in U.S. There is no known cure, and available treatment options have major side effects and every patient responds differently. Plus, a medication that puts someone into remission today often suddenly stops working after a year or two, requiring additional trial and error to find a new treatment that helps. As a result, surgery is common and is needed for 70% of Crohn’s disease and 30% of ulcerative colitis patients.

Given the high need of this patient population, Oshi, the first an all-in-one solution for IBD patients, will provide products and services that will be in high demand for all stakeholders across the IBD community, including employers & payers.

Oshi supports automated syncing of health data from leading fitness devices, sensors, and wearables (IoT). Our platform is used to collect patient-reported outcomes data in real time. Improved disease management means more “good days” and less down time or lost productivity.

There is evidence that tools such as Oshi improve quality of care in IBD patients. We are undergoing a Randomized Control Study to demonstrate that patients using Oshi have better outcomes and cost less to treat than patients not using Oshi. This data will help us register as a Digital Therapeutic.

Please contact us to learn about ways we can support your patient population.

EMPLOYERS & PAYERS

Oshi Health shares the same goals of employers & payers in optimizing health & wellness and preventing diseases.

Currently, $28 billion is spent on IBD care in U.S. There is no known cure, and available treatment options have major side effects and every patient responds differently. Plus, a medication that puts someone into remission today often suddenly stops working after a year or two, requiring additional trial and error to find a new treatment that helps. As a result, surgery is common and is needed for 70% of Crohn’s disease and 30% of ulcerative colitis patients.

Given the high need of this patient population, Oshi, the first an all-in-one solution for IBD patients, will provide products and services that will be in high demand for all stakeholders across the IBD community, including employers & payers.

Oshi supports automated syncing of health data from leading fitness devices, sensors, and wearables (IoT). Our platform is used to collect patient-reported outcomes data in real time. Improved disease management means more “good days” and less down time or lost productivity.

There is evidence that tools such as Oshi improve quality of care in IBD patients. We are undergoing a Randomized Control Study to demonstrate that patients using Oshi have better outcomes and cost less to treat than patients not using Oshi. This data will help us register as a Digital Therapeutic.

Please contact us to learn about ways we can support your patient population.

PHARMA & THERAPEUTICS

group of scientists working at the laboratory.

Oshi Health addresses all stakeholders in the IBD ecosystem including patients & caregivers plus physicians & researchers. Very quickly, we have become the leading mobile app for IBD management. As we continue to grow, we will offer opportunities for pharmaceutical and therapeutic brands to interact with our community.

For example, we are currently developing a fully featured medical adherence tool on Oshi for patients & providers — and this creates unique opportunities for pharmaceutical brands. Within the Oshi app, we can offer content modules that educate your patients. Our platform enables you to provide digital resources (including video) that support all stages of treatment.

Please contact us to learn about ways we can support your brand’s needs.

PHARMA & THERAPEUTICS

group of scientists working at the laboratory.

Oshi Health addresses all stakeholders in the IBD ecosystem including patients & caregivers plus physicians & researchers. Very quickly, we have become the leading mobile app for IBD management. As we continue to grow, we will offer opportunities for pharmaceutical and therapeutic brands to interact with our community.

For example, we are currently developing a fully featured medical adherence tool on Oshi for patients & providers — and this creates unique opportunities for pharmaceutical brands. Within the Oshi app, we can offer content modules that educate your patients. Our platform enables you to provide digital resources (including video) that support all stages of treatment.

Please contact us to learn about ways we can support your brand’s needs.

Oshi is the first all-in-one app to help individuals live their best life with IBD. The free mobile app launched to the public in June 2018. User data is protected with best-in-class security.

Oshi is available for download on the Apple App Store or Android Google Play.

Oshi is the first all-in-one app to help individuals live their best life with IBD. The free mobile app launched to the public in June 2018. User data is protected with best-in-class security.

Oshi is available for download on the Apple App Store or Android Google Play.


ABOUT

Mission

We created Oshi because every single person with inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) is different. Keeping track of lifestyle factors that may affect IBD symptoms and well-being — and finding reliable information about the disease — is NOT easy. Oshi gives people the tools to make smarter decisions for living their best life with IBD. Oshi is the first all-in-one app where you can TRACK symptoms and actions (to discover hidden patterns about what might be triggering your flares), LEARN from an abundance of carefully curated content, and ASK our expert team of health professionals.

Mission

We created Oshi because every single person with inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) is different. Keeping track of lifestyle factors that may affect IBD symptoms and well-being — and finding reliable information about the disease — is NOT easy. Oshi gives people the tools to make smarter decisions for living their best life with IBD. Oshi is the first all-in-one app where you can TRACK symptoms and actions (to discover hidden patterns about what might be triggering your flares), LEARN from an abundance of carefully curated content, and ASK our expert team of health professionals.

Oshi Health Team

Oshi Health Team, IBD Crohns Colitis App

Clinical Advisors

Patient Advocates

Monthly Newsletter

Every month, Oshi sends a themed newsletter highlighting tracking tips and reminders plus some of the latest articles and patient questions. Each newsletter features an IBD patient or professional as guest editor who share their unique perspectives on important, real-world topics related to living your best life with IBD. Read past issues of the Oshi newsletter below. Sign up for the mailing list to receive the latest highlights from Oshi directly in your inbox!

October: Collaboration

September: Empowerment

August: Stress 

July: The Launch Issue

Monthly Newsletters

Every month, Oshi sends a themed newsletter highlighting tracking tips and reminders plus some of the latest articles and patient questions. Each newsletter features an IBD patient or professional as guest editor who share their unique perspectives on important, real-world topics related to living your best life with IBD. Read past issues of the Oshi newsletter below. Sign up for the mailing list to receive the latest highlights from Oshi directly in your inbox!

October: Collaboration

September: Empowerment

August: Stress 

July: The Launch Issue

Oshi is available for download on the Apple App Store or Android Google Play.


PARTNERSHIPS - OLD

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Doctors & Researchers

Doctors
Improved care for your patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) including Crohn’s Disease & Ulcerative Colitis
Get the info your patients aren’t sharing (symptoms or issues they think are not important or too embarrassing to talk about)

Benefits of tracking with Oshi:
Improves the quality of care you are able to deliver to your patients by empowering you with longitudinally tracked health data
Minimize trial and error for patients - help to identify key characteristics that might indicate a match for specific treatments or medications
All-in-one app also provides dynamic and engaging content for patients that is medically-sound and reviewed by physicians and experts.

Doctor Testimonial from Dr. Hamilton or Dr. Chang about how Oshi can help to improve patient experience with doctor visits, and get physicians the most helpful information/what they really want and need. (Note: Dr. Chang made a point in the workshop about medication tracking being more valuable than diet tracking.)

This app is great to have in your back pocket as you attend doctor’s appointments. You can look at all the information you’ve tracked and be able to communicate clearly what your needs are and where your concerns are. We now have the power to advance our own healthcare and give our GIs a clear look at the story of our day-to-day lives. --Natalie Hayden, Patient Advocate

Customize Oshi for your practice
Create a 5-star patient experience with a customized Oshi app for your practice. Add tracking or patient support based on your practice. Embed it into other aspects of your online care offering to create a seamless experience.

Researchers
Identify new opportunities to make a difference
Real-world evidence plus patient-reported outcomes from Oshi users can be valuable source of new directions for research based in real patient experiences.

Proven and reliable
Uses 2 of the highest ranked validated PRO questionnaires for mobile use:
•UCLA mHealth Index for UC/CD
•ICHOM IBD Control

Clinical Research
Empowering medical researchers with a digital solution for patient engagement, data gathering, and analysis
The end-to-end patient interface for GI-focused Clinical Studies

Oshi Health is innovating with disruptive tech that will improve the lives of people with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The research platform is the world-leading tool in IBD for collecting robust clinical phenotyping and patient reported data. --Dr. Charlie Lees, Gastroenterologist & Researcher, University of Edinburgh

Customize Oshi to Support your Research Objectives
Adapts to specific research, study design, and data collection needs
Improves patient experience and engagement with flexible features and content
Maximizes study data set with opportunity to integrate with devices, wearables, and sensors
Integrates captured data directly with existing research database
Allows for on-demand study design improvement through real-time analysis and feedback
Manages patient consent / reconsent


Please contact us to learn about ways we can support your practice, patients and research. We are ready to help your practice increase and improve your online suite of patient services!

Employers & Payers

Improved care for your team
Improved disease management means more “good days” and less down time or lost productivity. Work with us to find ways to support your team with tracking, education, and wellness.

Customize Oshi for your team
Create a customized health and wellness tracking experience for your team based in the already-proven Oshi app. Add tracking, support, and benefit information based on your organization’s specific needs. Embed Oshi into other aspects of your online care offering to create a seamless experience.

Please contact us to learn about using Oshi to support your patient population. We are eager to learn how we can help your organization take care of your team!

Pharma & Therapeutics

Support trials and follow-up surveys with the real-world evidence plus patient-reported outcomes that the Oshi app can provide. Customizing the Oshi experience (which already includes symptom tracking and patient-reported wellness) allows you to focus efforts and resources toward your achieving research and trial goals rather than toward developing a streamlined way to collect real-time patient data.

Please contact us to learn about ways we can use Oshi to support your therapeutic needs.


OSHI MOBILE APP

We created the Oshi IBD Tracking App because every single person with inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) is different. Keeping track of lifestyle factors that may affect your IBD symptoms and wellness—and finding reliable information about the disease—is super-important, but it’s NOT easy. That’s where Oshi comes in!
Oshi is the first all-in-one app where you can Track, Learn, and Ask.

We created the Oshi IBD Tracking App because every single person with inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) is different. Keeping track of lifestyle factors that may affect your IBD symptoms and wellness—and finding reliable information about the disease—is super-important, but it’s NOT easy. That’s where Oshi comes in!
Oshi is the first all-in-one app where you can Track, Learn, and Ask.

TRACK

Oshi, the IBD Tracking App, helps you uncover hidden patterns to allow you to figure out what triggers your flares. Add your symptoms and actions to Oshi, plus automatically import data from popular fitness devices. Oshi will then provide your own personalized Wellness and Symptom Scores for a comprehensive view of your well-being. Working with your doctor, Oshi can help you gain new insights for treating and managing your IBD.

Your Own Personalized Oshi Wellness Score
Everything you TRACK in Oshi matters—including the information you import from other devices and apps, like activity trackers. Oshi uses all that tracking data to calculate your own personalized Wellness Score.
This is the very first score of its kind for people with IBD. It actually has the power to help you uncover hidden patterns that might be triggering your flares. That’s why we’re so excited about this powerful tool that can help you live your best life with IBD!

TRACK

Oshi, the IBD Tracking App, helps you uncover hidden patterns to allow you to figure out what triggers your flares. Add your symptoms and actions to Oshi, plus automatically import data from popular fitness devices. Oshi will then provide your own personalized Wellness and Symptom Scores for a comprehensive view of your well-being. Working with your doctor, Oshi can help you gain new insights for treating and managing your IBD.

Your Own Personalized Oshi Wellness Score
Everything you TRACK in Oshi matters—including the information you import from other devices and apps, like activity trackers. Oshi uses all that tracking data to calculate your own personalized Wellness Score.

This is the very first score of its kind for people with IBD. It actually has the power to help you uncover hidden patterns that might be triggering your flares. That’s why we’re so excited about this powerful tool that can help you live your best life with IBD!

4 Factors Being Tracked

Your Wellness Score gets calculated in “real time.” So every time you enter more data (manually or via a connected device), your score automatically gets updated.

To calculate your Wellness Score, Oshi uses seven days’ worth of tracking input about your:

  • Stress
  • Diet
  • Sleep
  • Activity/Exercise

Oshi tracks these four categories because they’re the factors that people with IBD believe make the biggest difference when it comes to triggering IBD symptoms.

Naturally, the more you track, the more helpful Oshi can be. We recommend tracking every day, multiple times a day. (Oshi knows to use the latest data from each day when it’s calculating your Wellness Score.)

4 Factors Being Tracked

Your Wellness Score gets calculated in “real time.” So every time you enter more data (manually or via a connected device), your score automatically gets updated.

To calculate your Wellness Score, Oshi uses seven days’ worth of tracking input about your:

  • Stress
  • Diet
  • Sleep
  • Activity/Exercise

Oshi tracks these four categories because they’re the factors that people with IBD believe make the biggest difference when it comes to triggering IBD symptoms.

Naturally, the more you track, the more helpful Oshi can be. We recommend tracking every day, multiple times a day. (Oshi knows to use the latest data from each day when it’s calculating your Wellness Score.)

Understanding the Score

Each of the four categories that you track will contribute between 0 and 25 points toward your Wellness Score. When you add up the points for each category, you get your overall score, with the highest possible score being 100.

Some things you track will contribute positive points toward your Well-Being Score, like getting a good night’s sleep. Other actions will deduct points, like feeling really stressed.

Of course, we didn’t randomly assign points in Oshi. Instead, we worked with our team of physician-partners who are experts in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis).

Together, we came up with an optimal range for each area being tracked. For example: Getting a good night’s sleep will contribute 25 points toward your score. But getting an excessive amount of sleep will actually cause some points to be deducted from your score.

A Great Score

A Great score means your tracking inputs were in this range:

Stress: 0 to 33.Oshi’s unique sliding scale allows you to rate your stress level at any number between 0 and 100. As long as your stress level rating inputs are between 0 and 33, you’ll get a high score for Stress.

Diet: Nothing off-plan. You’ve told Oshi which foods you are avoiding, so as long as you actually do avoid all of those foods, you’ll get a high score for Diet.

Sleep: 7 to 8 hours. Oshi’s physician-partners recommend getting 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night.

Activity/Exercise: At least 300 calories burned. Numerous studies have concluded that we should try to burn 300 calories or more each day.

A Below Average Score

A Below Average score means your tracking inputs were in this range:

Stress: 67 to 100. Stress tends to be a trigger for IBD and a wide variety of other diseases, so Oshi will remind you that you’ve been really stressed.

Diet: More than 50% off-plan. You’ve been eating a whole lot of the foods you said you need to avoid, which probably means you aren’t feeling so great. This also makes it really hard to detect which of those foods could be triggering your symptoms.

Sleep: Less than 5 hours OR greater than 12 hours. According to Oshi’s physician-partners, sleeping too little—and also sleeping too much—can both be signs of trouble.

Activity/Exercise: Less than 100 calories burned. A sedentary lifestyle can impact symptoms.

Once again: The more you track, the more Oshi can help. So let’s work together to help you feel better!

Understanding the Score

Each of the four categories that you track will contribute between 0 and 25 points toward your Wellness Score. When you add up the points for each category, you get your overall score, with the highest possible score being 100.

Some things you track will contribute positive points toward your Well-Being Score, like getting a good night’s sleep. Other actions will deduct points, like feeling really stressed.

Of course, we didn’t randomly assign points in Oshi. Instead, we worked with our team of physician-partners who are experts in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis).

Together, we came up with an optimal range for each area being tracked. For example: Getting a good night’s sleep will contribute 25 points toward your score. But getting an excessive amount of sleep will actually cause some points to be deducted from your score.

A Great Score

A Great score means your tracking inputs were in this range:

Stress: 0 to 33. Oshi’s unique sliding scale allows you to rate your stress level at any number between 0 and 100. As long as your stress level rating inputs are between 0 and 33, you’ll get a high score for Stress.

Diet: Nothing off-plan. You’ve told Oshi which foods you are avoiding, so as long as you actually do avoid all of those foods, you’ll get a high score for Diet.

Sleep: 7 to 8 hours. Oshi’s physician-partners recommend getting 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night.

Activity/Exercise: At least 300 calories burned. Numerous studies have concluded that we should try to burn 300 calories or more each day.

A Below Average Score

A Below Average score means your tracking inputs were in this range:

Stress: 67 to 100. Stress tends to be a trigger for IBD and a wide variety of other diseases, so Oshi will remind you that you’ve been really stressed.

Diet: More than 50% off-plan. You’ve been eating a whole lot of the foods you said you need to avoid, which probably means you aren’t feeling so great. This also makes it really hard to detect which of those foods could be triggering your symptoms.

Sleep: Less than 5 hours OR greater than 12 hours. According to Oshi’s physician-partners, sleeping too little—and also sleeping too much—can both be signs of trouble.

Activity/Exercise: Less than 100 calories burned. A sedentary lifestyle can impact symptoms.

Once again: The more you track, the more Oshi can help. So let’s work together to help you feel better!

LEARN

Oshi includes a magazine’s worth of thoughtfully curated content personalized to your interests. You’ll discover information on emerging treatments and new discoveries, plus diet and nutrition advice with IBD-friendly recipes. You’ll also find inspiration from our team of patient-advocates sharing insights from every stage of their personal journeys.

Content categories include:
  • Complementary Medicine
  • Diet and Nutrition
  • Life Happens!
  • Medical Treatments
  • News and Discoveries
  • Real-Life Success Stories
  • Stress and Mindfulness
  • Symptom Relief and Exercise
  • Understanding IBD

LEARN

Oshi includes a magazine’s worth of thoughtfully curated content personalized to your interests. You’ll discover information on emerging treatments and new discoveries, plus diet and nutrition advice with IBD-friendly recipes. You’ll also find inspiration from our team of patient-advocates sharing insights from every stage of their personal journeys.

Content categories include:
  • Complementary Medicine
  • Diet and Nutrition
  • Life Happens!
  • Medical Treatments
  • News and Discoveries
  • Real-Life Success Stories
  • Stress and Mindfulness
  • Symptom Relief and Exercise
  • Understanding IBD

ASK

Have a question about anything from symptoms to supplements?

Our gastroenterologists and health professionals provide answers and address your IBD concerns. Oshi experts also share tips, from choosing the right doctor to improving your chances of remission.

ASK

Have a question about anything from symptoms to supplements?

Our gastroenterologists and health professionals provide answers and address your IBD concerns. Oshi experts also share tips, from choosing the right doctor to improving your chances of remission.

Our goal is to provide you with the best-available digital platform to help you manage and control IBD. We are always working to improve Oshi, and we want to hear from you!

Please contact us with comments or suggestions.

Oshi is available for download on the Apple App Store or Android Google Play.

Our goal is to provide you with the best-available digital platform to help you manage and control IBD. We are always working to improve Oshi, and we want to hear from you!

Please contact us with comments or suggestions.

Oshi is available for download on the Apple App Store or Android Google Play.


Understanding IBD

More than 3 million people in the U.S. are living with IBD (about 11 million people worldwide), and the disease’s prevalence continues to grow. Every person with IBD is different in so many ways, including their specific diagnosis, disease severity, and disease location in the GI system. IBD also affects their quality of life and ability to work, go to school, take care of children, and more. The articles below — and many more — are available in the Oshi app.

Oshi is a tracking tool and content resource. It does not render medical advice or services, and it is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. You should always review this information with your healthcare professionals.

Oshi is available for download on the Apple App Store or Android Google Play.

More than 3 million people in the U.S. are living with IBD (about 11 million people worldwide), and the disease’s prevalence continues to grow. Every person with IBD is different in so many ways, including their specific diagnosis, disease severity, and disease location in the GI system. IBD also affects their quality of life and ability to work, go to school, take care of children, and more. The articles below — and many more — are available in the Oshi app.

Oshi is a tracking tool and content resource. It does not render medical advice or services, and it is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. You should always review this information with your healthcare professionals.

Oshi is available for download on the Apple App Store or Android Google Play.

WHAT IS IBD?

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) manifests itself differently in everyone who lives with it, and its many potential issues can be hard to understand for those who don’t. Here’s a cheat sheet on what IBD is—for you and for anyone who’s been peppering you with questions.

WHAT IS IBD?

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) manifests itself differently in everyone who lives with it, and its many potential issues can be hard to understand for those who don’t. Here’s a cheat sheet on what IBD is—for you and for anyone who’s been peppering you with questions.

What Exactly Is IBD, Anyway?

IBD is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects the intestines. Depending on the site involved and the degree of inflammation, an individual with IBD will have a characteristic set of symptoms and possible complications. There are two major types of IBD: Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC).

What’s the Difference Between Crohn’s and UC?

Ulcerative colitis is limited to the lining of the colon, where it causes inflammation and sores (ulcers). Crohn’s disease can cause inflammation in the full thickness of the wall of the intestine and along the entire digestive tract. However, Crohn’s usually manifests in the small intestine or colon.

What Are the Symptoms of IBD?

People with IBD may experience diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, blood in their stool, constipation, fatigue, trouble sleeping, weight loss, dehydration, and nutrient deficiencies. When symptoms are present, a person is considered to be having a flare-up or flare.

What Causes IBD?

Researchers are still working to discover the cause (or causes) of IBD, which may differ depending on the individual and the type of IBD. In some people, IBD may be caused by their body’s immune system attacking its own intestinal tissue, leading to inflammation, although this theory hasn’t been proven. Other possible causes include an imbalance of bacteria in the gut microbiome, or a variety of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors.

How Is IBD Diagnosed?

To diagnose gastrointestinal symptoms, your primary care physician or gastroenterologist may run a series of tests to determine if you’re experiencing anemia, an infection, or blood in the stool. Additionally, a colonoscopy, endoscopy, or enteroscopy may be performed to examine the tissues in your intestines. Imaging procedures, such as CT scans and MRIs, also may be ordered to get a full picture of your digestive tract. Your doctor will use all of this information to determine if you have IBD, and if so, where it’s manifesting and what type it is.

What Exactly Is IBD, Anyway?

IBD is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects the intestines. Depending on the site involved and the degree of inflammation, an individual with IBD will have a characteristic set of symptoms and possible complications. There are two major types of IBD: Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC).

What’s the Difference Between Crohn’s and UC?

Ulcerative colitis is limited to the lining of the colon, where it causes inflammation and sores (ulcers). Crohn’s disease can cause inflammation in the full thickness of the wall of the intestine and along the entire digestive tract. However, Crohn’s usually manifests in the small intestine or colon.

What Are the Symptoms of IBD?

People with IBD may experience diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, blood in their stool, constipation, fatigue, trouble sleeping, weight loss, dehydration, and nutrient deficiencies. When symptoms are present, a person is considered to be having a flare-up or flare.

What Causes IBD?

Researchers are still working to discover the cause (or causes) of IBD, which may differ depending on the individual and the type of IBD. In some people, IBD may be caused by their body’s immune system attacking its own intestinal tissue, leading to inflammation, although this theory hasn’t been proven. Other possible causes include an imbalance of bacteria in the gut microbiome, or a variety of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors.

How Is IBD Diagnosed?

To diagnose gastrointestinal symptoms, your primary care physician or gastroenterologist may run a series of tests to determine if you’re experiencing anemia, an infection, or blood in the stool. Additionally, a colonoscopy, endoscopy, or enteroscopy may be performed to examine the tissues in your intestines. Imaging procedures, such as CT scans and MRIs, also may be ordered to get a full picture of your digestive tract. Your doctor will use all of this information to determine if you have IBD, and if so, where it’s manifesting and what type it is.

What Are Some Other Ways to Cope?

Finding a support network or online group of fellow IBD warriors may be helpful. Non-profit organizations for patient support and education like the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation are an excellent resource. Educating yourself about the disease also may prove beneficial for your own peace of mind.

Tracking your symptoms—along with diet, sleep, exercise, and stress levels—also has helped to empower a lot of people with IBD to better manage their quality of life and reduce flares.

How Many People Have IBD?

If you’re living with IBD, you’re not alone: An estimated 3 million people in the U.S. reported being diagnosed with IBD in 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Is There a Cure for IBD?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a cure for IBD—at least, not yet—but medical treatments, lifestyle changes, and complementary therapies have helped many IBD warriors soothe their symptoms and even reach a stage where they’re no longer experiencing flares, which is generally considered being “in remission.”

What Are Some Other Ways to Cope?

Finding a support network or online group of fellow IBD warriors may be helpful. Non-profit organizations for patient support and education like the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation are an excellent resource. Educating yourself about the disease also may prove beneficial for your own peace of mind.

Tracking your symptoms—along with diet, sleep, exercise, and stress levels—also has helped to empower a lot of people with IBD to better manage their quality of life and reduce flares.

How Many People Have IBD?

If you’re living with IBD, you’re not alone: An estimated 3 million people in the U.S. reported being diagnosed with IBD in 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Is There a Cure for IBD?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a cure for IBD—at least, not yet—but medical treatments, lifestyle changes, and complementary therapies have helped many IBD warriors soothe their symptoms and even reach a stage where they’re no longer experiencing flares, which is generally considered being “in remission.”

IBD vs IBS

Know the Difference

Lots of people get confused when it comes to IBS and IBD. Not only do they sound similar, but they have a lot of similar symptoms. People with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) typically experience abdominal pain and a variety of related gastrointestinal issues, as do people with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis). To help make it easier to understand the similarities and differences between the two, we’ve put together this handy compare-and-contrast guide.

IBD vs IBS

Know the Difference

Lots of people get confused when it comes to IBS and IBD. Not only do they sound similar, but they have a lot of similar symptoms. People with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) typically experience abdominal pain and a variety of related gastrointestinal issues, as do people with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis). To help make it easier to understand the similarities and differences between the two, we’ve put together this handy compare-and-contrast guide.

Symptoms

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Many IBS sufferers experience recurring symptoms, including a combination of cramps, diarrhea, constipation, and/or abdominal pain and bloating. They may also have food intolerances, fatigue, anxiety, and depression.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: People with IBD may experience ALL of the symptoms related to IBS. The biggest difference between the two, symptom-wise, is that people with IBD may also have fever, blood in their stool, reduced appetite with nausea and/or vomiting, and weight loss.

Symptoms

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Many IBS sufferers experience recurring symptoms, including a combination of cramps, diarrhea, constipation, and/or abdominal pain and bloating. They may also have food intolerances, fatigue, anxiety, and depression.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: People with IBD may experience ALL of the symptoms related to IBS. The biggest difference between the two, symptom-wise, is that people with IBD may also have fever, blood in their stool, reduced appetite with nausea and/or vomiting, and weight loss.

Causes

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: We do not yet know what causes IBS, but an international survey of 40,000 people concluded the condition may be triggered by stress in some form or another. Most (but not all) IBS sufferers are women: IBS is about 1.5 to 3 times more prevalent in women compared with men, and some experts theorize that the condition may be triggered by hormonal changes.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: As with IBS, experts haven’t figured out what causes IBD. Some possibilities include genetic or hereditary factors, the makeup of bacteria in the digestive system, cigarette smoking, and environmental factors.

Causes

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: We do not yet know what causes IBS, but an international survey of 40,000 people concluded the condition may be triggered by stress in some form or another. Most (but not all) IBS sufferers are women: IBS is about 1.5 to 3 times more prevalent in women compared with men, and some experts theorize that the condition may be triggered by hormonal changes.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: As with IBS, experts haven’t figured out what causes IBD. Some possibilities include genetic or hereditary factors, the makeup of bacteria in the digestive system, cigarette smoking, and environmental factors.

Diagnosis

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: IBS is often diagnosed by examining your medical history and by blood tests and stool inspection. Doctors may want to exclude other GI conditions that present in the same way.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Doctors often diagnose IBD by performing a colonoscopy and possibly an upper endoscopy, as well as ordering blood tests and special X-rays or MRIs.

Diagnosis

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: IBS is often diagnosed by examining your medical history and by blood tests and stool inspection. Doctors may want to exclude other GI conditions that present in the same way.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Doctors often diagnose IBD by performing a colonoscopy and possibly an upper endoscopy, as well as ordering blood tests and special X-rays or MRIs.

Severity

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Although IBS is not considered as debilitating as IBD, the psychological and physical reactions can take a serious toll on quality of life. As such, treatment is often considered necessary to address the symptoms of IBS.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: IBD is considered a chronic autoimmune disease. Depending on its severity, it can significantly limit quality of life and interfere with social activities, as well as school and work. While IBD itself is not considered fatal, it can result in systemic illnesses, such as anemia and nutrient deficiencies, and can lead to serious complications like infections and even colon cancer.

Severity

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Although IBS is not considered as debilitating as IBD, the psychological and physical reactions can take a serious toll on quality of life. As such, treatment is often considered necessary to address the symptoms of IBS.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: IBD is considered a chronic autoimmune disease. Depending on its severity, it can significantly limit quality of life and interfere with social activities, as well as school and work. While IBD itself is not considered fatal, it can result in systemic illnesses, such as anemia and nutrient deficiencies, and can lead to serious complications like infections and even colon cancer.

Treatment

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Treatment for IBS can range from making dietary and lifestyle changes to taking prescription medications aimed at managing bowel activity and nerves.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The wide array of treatment options for those who suffer from IBD include lifestyle changes, dietary changes, Western medical treatments (ranging from corticosteroids and other medications to target the immune system to surgery), as well as alternative and complementary medical treatments.

Treatment

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Treatment for IBS can range from making dietary and lifestyle changes to taking prescription medications aimed at managing bowel activity and nerves.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The wide array of treatment options for those who suffer from IBD include lifestyle changes, dietary changes, Western medical treatments (ranging from corticosteroids and other medications to target the immune system to surgery), as well as alternative and complementary medical treatments.

INDIVIDUALIZED CARE

Everybody with IBD is Different

If you have been diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), you likely have a unique set of symptoms and issues as a result of where the inflammation manifests in your intestines and how your body reacts to this inflammation. The IBDs are complex disorders that are different in every affected individual; no two people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis are the same.

INDIVIDUALIZED CARE

Everybody with IBD is Different

If you have been diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), you likely have a unique set of symptoms and issues as a result of where the inflammation manifests in your intestines and how your body reacts to this inflammation. The IBDs are complex disorders that are different in every affected individual; no two people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis are the same.

For example, Crohn’s disease may be located in the small intestine, colon, or a combination of both, and it may be one of three different types: one that causes just inflammation, one that causes strictures or narrowing in the intestine, or one that causes fistulas (or connections) between the intestine and other parts of the body, like out to the skin.

To complicate matters more, even people with the same type and location of IBD may have different symptoms due to their differences in pain tolerance, differing responses to medications, and the presence of other symptoms associated with IBD, such as joint pain.

Fortunately, in recent years, the healthcare provider community has begun to embrace the concept of “individualized care,” and it is now gaining momentum among specialists who treat IBD. Many of these physicians now acknowledge that all facets of a person’s disease and how it affects them have to be considered when deciding on the optimal treatment plan.

For example, Crohn’s disease may be located in the small intestine, colon, or a combination of both, and it may be one of three different types: one that causes just inflammation, one that causes strictures or narrowing in the intestine, or one that causes fistulas (or connections) between the intestine and other parts of the body, like out to the skin.

To complicate matters more, even people with the same type and location of IBD may have different symptoms due to their differences in pain tolerance, differing responses to medications, and the presence of other symptoms associated with IBD, such as joint pain.

Fortunately, in recent years, the healthcare provider community has begun to embrace the concept of “individualized care,” and it is now gaining momentum among specialists who treat IBD. Many of these physicians now acknowledge that all facets of a person’s disease and how it affects them have to be considered when deciding on the optimal treatment plan.

Individualized Care in Action

Here’s an example of how individualized care might look: Let’s say two patients with Crohn’s disease walk into an IBD clinic to see the doctor. They may have both been diagnosed with the same disease, but it looks and feels different for each one of them.

Individualized Care in Action

Here’s an example of how individualized care might look: Let’s say two patients with Crohn’s disease walk into an IBD clinic to see the doctor. They may have both been diagnosed with the same disease, but it looks and feels different for each one of them.

The first individual has intermittent loose stools and abdominal cramping, while the second person has those symptoms plus abdominal pain around the belly button area, occasional nausea, and weight loss. The first person is able to work and take care of her family, while the second has had to take time away from his school and is not eating or sleeping well. The doctor’s diagnostic workup reveals differences in terms of where the disease is located in each person, too.

So now, the doctor can take all of that information into account and also factor in how the disease affects each individual’s overall well-being. Based on all of this information, the first patient is prescribed an oral topical steroid medication called Budesonide, while the second is treated with a biologic, as well as the systemic steroid Prednisone and a modified diet.

The first individual has intermittent loose stools and abdominal cramping, while the second person has those symptoms plus abdominal pain around the belly button area, occasional nausea, and weight loss. The first person is able to work and take care of her family, while the second has had to take time away from his school and is not eating or sleeping well. The doctor’s diagnostic workup reveals differences in terms of where the disease is located in each person, too.

So now, the doctor can take all of that information into account and also factor in how the disease affects each individual’s overall well-being. Based on all of this information, the first patient is prescribed an oral topical steroid medication called Budesonide, while the second is treated with a biologic, as well as the systemic steroid Prednisone and a modified diet.

Beware of “Dr. Google”

The fact that no two people with IBD are alike is important to keep in mind whenever you’re searching the Internet for information. If you are one of the millions of people who search “Dr. Google” on a regular basis, remember that search engines are limited by the information you input to start your search, and they don’t necessarily know whether or not sites are credible and correspond to your specific disease.

In addition, a search for something like “Crohn’s disease” and “abdominal pain” will likely result in a slew of information that does not necessarily correspond to your unique body. You may receive advice on anti-inflammatory medications or diets or probiotics that would be great for someone else with Crohn’s disease, but not for you.

Beware of “Dr. Google”

The fact that no two people with IBD are alike is important to keep in mind whenever you’re searching the Internet for information. If you are one of the millions of people who search “Dr. Google” on a regular basis, remember that search engines are limited by the information you input to start your search, and they don’t necessarily know whether or not sites are credible and correspond to your specific disease.

In addition, a search for something like “Crohn’s disease” and “abdominal pain” will likely result in a slew of information that does not necessarily correspond to your unique body. You may receive advice on anti-inflammatory medications or diets or probiotics that would be great for someone else with Crohn’s disease, but not for you.

Individualizing Your Treatment Plan

Fortunately, individualized care is rapidly becoming the accepted way to treat IBD. You may want to speak with your healthcare providers to ensure your treatment plan has been custom-tailored for you—and to make sure it’s up-to-date based on the latest information about your symptoms, how these symptoms are affecting you on a day-to-day basis, and the disease characteristics discovered by your physician on diagnostic workup.

When a doctor asks a lot of questions about your various symptoms, take the time to explain what is ongoing—and, if this is a return visit, be sure to share what has changed since your last visit. To round out your care, make sure to discuss how the disease affects you on a daily basis in terms of sleep, exercise, relaxation, and the ability to work or go to school or take care of family.

Next, your doctor may order a series of tests to learn more about what type of IBD you have.

It is important to discuss with your doctor all the aspects that characterize your IBD for a greater understanding of your specific disease. For example, you may want to ask:

  • Where your inflammation is located (small intestine vs. colon, where in the colon?)
  • How severe it is (mild, moderate, or severe)
  • Whether or not it is thought to be in remission

Based on all this information, your doctor will be able to discuss treatment options with you, such as anti-inflammatories, medications that modulate the immune system, or biologic medications, or a combination of these. In the individualized care model, doctors also will take into consideration your preferences based on medications’ safety profiles, side effects, and mode of delivery (such as pills vs. injections vs. infusions).

Using all the information that is unique to you, the doctor also will be able to prescribe a diet that is right for you, keeping in mind that this may change through the course of the disease. The doctor also will reinforce with you the need for rest, exercise, and relaxation.

This kind of individualized plan of care will likely be the fastest and safest approach to get you feeling well again and to get your IBD into remission.

Individualizing Your Treatment Plan

Fortunately, individualized care is rapidly becoming the accepted way to treat IBD. You may want to speak with your healthcare providers to ensure your treatment plan has been custom-tailored for you—and to make sure it’s up-to-date based on the latest information about your symptoms, how these symptoms are affecting you on a day-to-day basis, and the disease characteristics discovered by your physician on diagnostic workup.

When a doctor asks a lot of questions about your various symptoms, take the time to explain what is ongoing—and, if this is a return visit, be sure to share what has changed since your last visit. To round out your care, make sure to discuss how the disease affects you on a daily basis in terms of sleep, exercise, relaxation, and the ability to work or go to school or take care of family.

Next, your doctor may order a series of tests to learn more about what type of IBD you have.

It is important to discuss with your doctor all the aspects that characterize your IBD for a greater understanding of your specific disease. For example, you may want to ask:

  • Where your inflammation is located (small intestine vs. colon, where in the colon?)
  • How severe it is (mild, moderate, or severe)
  • Whether or not it is thought to be in remission

Based on all this information, your doctor will be able to discuss treatment options with you, such as anti-inflammatories, medications that modulate the immune system, or biologic medications, or a combination of these. In the individualized care model, doctors also will take into consideration your preferences based on medications’ safety profiles, side effects, and mode of delivery (such as pills vs. injections vs. infusions).

Using all the information that is unique to you, the doctor also will be able to prescribe a diet that is right for you, keeping in mind that this may change through the course of the disease. The doctor also will reinforce with you the need for rest, exercise, and relaxation.

This kind of individualized plan of care will likely be the fastest and safest approach to get you feeling well again and to get your IBD into remission.

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Live Your Best Life:

Everybody with IBD is different. That’s why we created Oshi: a brand-new app that’s designed to help you — and your unique body — navigate life with IBD.

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Live Your Best Life:

Everybody with IBD is different. That’s why we created Oshi: a brand-new app that’s designed to help you — and your unique body — navigate life with IBD.

Download Now

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Download Oshi, the IBD Tracker from the Apple App Store or Android Google Play.

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